Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Maryland House Bill 339

Would require helmets for adults on bicycles.

HOUSE BILL 339 (pdf).



Soccer, Skiing, Tennis, Running, Swimming, Triathlon …

In testimony later Tuesday, Fuentes said he had worked [with/on/up] athletes in “all kinds” of sports.

“I worked with individual sportspersons… of all kinds,” he said.

via Velonews: Hamilton official Puerto witness; Fuentes admits working with athletes across sports.

Should we poke that hornets’ nest? There is no culture of lying about doping in pro soccer, because those guys never get asked about it.

I don’t want to hear some wingback swear on the soul of his dead dog that he’s clean.



Fracking boom puts North Dakota hospitals in red

A less obvious form of corporate welfare.

The furious pace of oil exploration that has made North Dakota one of the healthiest economies in the country has had the opposite effect on the region’s health care providers. Swamped by uninsured laborers flocking to dangerous jobs, medical facilities in the area are sinking under skyrocketing debt, a flood of gruesome injuries and bloated business costs from the inflated economy.

via Boom in North Dakota Weighs Heavily on Health Care – NYTimes.com.

This post is an interesting companion to the one below.



30%

Rampant waste and environmental degradation have been part of the Bakken boom. The state doesn’t care about that, but it wants its taxes.

Helms estimates that about 30% of the gas produced in the state is flared, since development of takeaway infrastructure has not matched the pace of drilling.

Producers are currently allowed to flare gas for a year without paying royalties. The new bill would extend that tax-exempt period for two more years if an operator can collect at least 75% of the produced gas.

via N. Dakota tax bills pique industry interest – Upstreamonline.com.



#stilldoping
January 25, 2013, 06:24
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

Tweet from Vaughters:

@Vaughters: @Velo_Vicar So common, that during my time as a rider on a div 1 team, I cannot think of any div1 rider who never doped, outside of Bassons.

That Was Then, This is Now. So clean now. Blood so pure.



MLK would have strongly disapproved of Obama’s policies

This has been your post-MLK/Inauguration Day reality check.



Carmichael into the meat grinder

Took em long enough.

Strock, who was 17 in 1990, said later he was given pills and injections daily and told they were “vitamins.”

After a race in Washington in 1990, Wenzel took Strock to Carmichael’s motel room, according to the book “From Lance to Landis” by David Walsh, where Carmichael  appeared with a hard-sided briefcase.

“Inside were pills, ampoules and syringes. Selecting an ampoule and syringe, Carmichael inserted the needle into the ampoule, drew some liquid and injected Strock in the upper part of the buttocks,” Walsh wrote. Strock said he was told the injection was “extract of cortisone” — a substance that does not exist.

Stock later saw Carmichael at other races with the briefcase, Walsh wrote.

In 2000, Strock and Kaiter sued USA Cycling in Colorado, claiming the drugs had ruined their health. Latta brought a similar suit in Oregon.

USA Cycling in 2006 paid Strock and Kaiter $250,000 each, according to Walsh.

Carmichael kept his name out of the lawsuit, according to Walsh, by paying Strock an amount believed to be $20,000.

“Carmichael agreed to settle very quickly,” Wenzel told a Danish newspaper in 2006. “In hindsight that was probably a smart idea.”

via Questions remain about doping ties to Armstrong's coach | carmichael, armstrong, coach – Colorado Springs Gazette, CO.

What’s more evil than a coach injecting a kid athlete with some illicit rocket fuel and lying to him about what’s in the syringe?

Kudos to Dave Phillips at CS Gazette for getting into Carmichael’s junk stack.



What a bust

Lance, instead of going all righteous scorched earth on the corrupt UCI and the peloton weasels who all claim to have magically sworn off EPO at the same time, joined his former friends in trying to convince the world that cycling suddenly flipped a 180 in 2005-2006 and entered a fresh n’ clean era of high integrity racing. Matt Beaudin at VeloNews doesn’t get it either:

Lance Armstrong this week fessed up to doping during his seven Tour de France wins, but it’s the things he didn’t say, the things he may have lied about still, that may haunt him yet…..

It was reported in the run-up to the interview that Armstrong considered outing friends and giving up the Union Cycliste Internationale. He did no such thing, and offered little meaningful assistance to a sport that’s suffering from an image problem, in large part due to the culture over which he presided, and helped further with aggressive pursuit of anyone even hinting at talking.

Over nearly three hours and two evenings, the fallen Tour de France star said more in a few words (all yeses, admitting to doping, and doping in every Tour win) than he had in a decade, but he left many scratching their heads, particularly at the notion that his comeback in 2009, during which he finished third at the Tour de France, was ridden on bread and water when blood data said otherwise.

“The last time I crossed that line was 2005,” Armstrong told Winfrey. On night two of a two-part interview, Armstrong said that in conversations with his former wife, Kristin, she made him promise not to use performance enhancing drugs if he were to return to the peloton.

“She said to me, ‘you can do it, under one condition: That you never cross that line again.’ And I said, ‘you got a deal.’ And I never would have betrayed that with her,” he said. “It’s a serious — it was a serious ask, it was a serious commitment.”

That commitment, however, has been refuted by math. In the 2009 Tour, Armstrong’s samples showed fewer red blood cells over a three-week stage race than would normally occur, indicating he was injecting supplemental blood.

Scientists noted that Armstrong’s blood has a less than one a million chance of naturally appearing in such a fashion. Nearly 40 samples were taken over the course of Armstrong’s comeback, providing a baseline for a biological passport.

“The sport was very clean,” Armstrong told Winfrey, citing the very biological passport that ensnared him. “I didn’t expect to get third. I expected to win, like I always expected. And at the end, I said to myself, ‘I just got beat by two guys who were better.’”

If he’s lying, the question is why. …

via Velonews.com: Zip the lips: After hours of TV, too many Armstrong questions remain.



Verbruggen happy
January 18, 2013, 19:23
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

“…in favor of the wider profile he could give the sport.” Also: In favor of six-figure cash awards.

Verbruggen, who has been accused of turning a blind eye to Armstrong’s activities in favor of the wider profile he could give the sport, insisted that on his watch the UCI “had always fought against doping.”

via Verbruggen happy Armstrong denied UCI doping complicity.

I mean, Lance tell Orpah no hanky panky, so must be true. Right guys? Yah! Okay! — Hein Verbruggen



It’s definitely not about the bike
January 17, 2013, 12:40
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

In a 2008 interview with the Journal, Verbruggen said he had never been involved in a business relationship with Ochowicz and Weisel. Reached by phone Wednesday, Verbruggen declined to comment. “It’s getting ridiculous,” he said when asked about the account.

Neither Weisel nor his lawyer responded to emails and phone messages Wednesday seeking comment about Verbruggen’s account at Weisel’s former firm. …

via New Twist in Armstrong Saga – WSJ.com.

Since we’re rounding up the weasels how come nobody mentions Chris Carmichael.




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