Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Wiggins out of the Tour de France

Big disappointment, a major high drama showdown between Big Wig and Froome was brewing.

“With illness, injury and treatment Brad has gone past the point where he can be ready for the Tour,” Sky boss Dave Brailsford said in a team statement. “It’s a big loss but, given these circumstances, we won’t consider him for selection.”

[...]

Wiggins said it was a “huge disappointment not to make the Tour.”

“I desperately wanted be there, for the team and for all the fans along the way — but it’s not going to happen,” Wiggins said. “I can’t train the way I need to train and I’m not going to be ready. Once you accept that, it’s almost a relief not having to worry about the injury and the race against time.

via Bradley Wiggins ruled out of the Tour de France.



The Journalists Who Met With Holder

The five journalists at the meeting were Harris [Politico]; Martin Baron, the executive editor of The Washington Post; Gerald Seib, the Wall Street Journal’s Washington bureau chief; Jane Mayer, The New Yorker staff writer; and Jim Warren, the Washington bureau chief for The New York Daily News.

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/05/eric-holder-doj-media-meetings-92055.html#ixzz2UqHFfSok



Hurst on the Webz

I appreciate the shout out from evworld.com, but fear what might happen when they reach the Prius chapter.

Writing about the “simple fun” of riding a bicycle in “The Cyclist’s Manifesto,” Robert Hurst put the technology in historical perspective, stating:


“Fun is apolitical. Fun has no agenda, other than to make you smile. And yet even the person who climbs onto a bike for the simple purpose of having fun or getting a whiff of fresh air will be saddled with the baggage of history, accompanied by a cloud of suspicion hanging around a machine that has at various times been intimately associated with women’s liberation, white power, political sneakiness, Asian communism, sabotage and spying and other rebel mischief, the Viet Cong, European socialism, illegal immigration, serial drunk drivers, anarchy, privilege, anti-car fanaticism, and multiple manifestations of youthful antiestablishment activities. This mishmash of historical symbolism is now woven into the collective subconscious of the nation. The bicycle is loaded.”

Until reading “Manifesto,” I had no idea that such an elegant and efficient machine carried so much historical baggage from across such a wide political and philosophical spectrum, from revolutionary communism to the epitome of capitalism, Henry Ford, himself, whose first ‘automobile’, the Quadracycle,’ was built largely from repurposed bicycle parts.

via Seven Solid Reasons Conservatives Should Love Bicycles : URBAN MOBILITY ON EVWORLD.COM.



New Yorker’s CitiBike Cover

Painfully slow rollout of NYC’s Citibike rental scheme is here, maybe. Lock up your daughters!

Interesting the artist put a helmet on the outside rider. Wonder if he/she was told to do that.

via http://publicbikeshare.com/2013/05/28/public-bike-share-a-picture-says-1000-words/

newyorkercitibike



No Bailout for Better Place

I wrote a little about this company’s scheme for swappable batteries and recharging stations in The Cyclist’s Manifesto, the book I wanted to call 1000 M.P.G. Noted the similarity of their scheme to what was working in NYC in the 1890s with Pope’s electric hansom cabs.

Better Place was situating itself to capitalize on the eventual demise of gas guzzling auto companies. But when certain key gas guzzling car companies tried to go paws-up, Dr. Obama and Co. stepped in and — Clear! — hit ‘em with the paddles. Priorities.

FORTUNE — Electric car company Better Place is planning to file for bankruptcy within the next several days, Fortune has learned.

The move will come seven months after the ouster of charismatic founder Shai Agassi, and five months after his successor — Evan Thornley, CEO of Better Place Australia – also departed.

via Exclusive: Better Place to file for bankruptcy – The Term Sheet: Fortune's deals blogTerm Sheet.



Track Record

Via Kurt Cobb in the CS Monitor:

Back in the year 2000, the IEA divined that by 2010, liquid fuel production worldwide would reach 95.8 million barrels per day (mbpd). The actual 2010 number was 87.1 mbpd. The agency further forecast an average daily oil price of $28.25 per barrel (adjusted for inflation). The actual average daily price of oil traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange in 2010 was $79.61

[...]

So, what made the IEA so sanguine about oil supply growth in the year 2000? It cited the revolution taking place in deepwater drilling technology which was expected to allow the extraction of oil supplies ample for the world’s needs for decades to come. But, deepwater drilling has turned out to be more challenging than anticipated and has not produced the bounty the IEA imagined it would. …

via When oil forecasts get it wrong – CSMonitor.com.



Air Cargo

Trending down.

aircargovolgrowthchart

Via Macronomics:

Macronomics: Air Traffic is pointing to additional economic activity weakness.




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