Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Hypoxia-induced gene doping
March 20, 2014, 12:54
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

Aha.

Numerous physical, pharmacological and/or genetic strategies exist that simulate the effects of hypoxia at the molecular and cellular level and increase expression of hypoxia-induced genes such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), its downstream targets such as erythropoietin (EPO) and consequently increase red blood cell production. While hypoxia was classically achieved by exposure to high altitude (hypobaric hypoxic exposure), there are currently numerous methodologies for achieving hypoxia-induced gene doping including chambers (normobaric hypoxia), chemicals and genetic manipulation. Our basic hypothesis is that exposure to different types of hypoxia lead to both a unique ‘molecular signature’ specific to the type of hypoxia as well as core ‘molecular signature’ irrespective of the type of hypoxia. Testing the ‘molecular signatures of hypoxia’ using blood samples from athletes will detect all the different forms (of physical, small molecule and gene-based) hypoxia-induced gene doping that are currently in use (or likely to be developed in the near future) with great sensitivity and specificity.

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London road casualties by user type

Begrimers take NEW YORK!

Citibike, that is.

A new study out of NYU: http://wagner.nyu.edu/rudincenter/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/CitiBikeTakesNewYork_.pdf

Citi Bike has become a vital element of the city’s transportation network, providing a new flexible mode for many New Yorkers. Trips that were once 20-minute walks are now 5-minute bike rides, and places previously inacces- sible by public transit are now linked to the network.

In its first six months of operation, Citi Bike riders took more than 6 million trips, and by early January, nearly 100,000 riders spent $95 to become annual members.

Bikeshare proven now to be among the safest forms of transport.



Chrysler orders donated Viper down the Memory Hole
March 7, 2014, 13:52
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Chrysler ordered a community college in Olympia, Wash. to crush a rare pre-production Doge [hilarious sic] Viper in pristine condition owned by the school.

Norm Chapman, an automotive technology professor at South Puget Sound Community College, told Q13FOX he received a letter from Chrysler, advising him that the college’s $250,000 1992 pre-production Dodge Viper must be destroyed.

While Chapman wasn’t sure why the order to destroy the classic car was issued, he did speculate to Q13FOX that crashes involving two other educational Vipers while being driven outside of the classroom illegally may have something to do with it.

The car, described by Chapman as a “once-in-a-lifetime car,” was donated to the college by Chrysler.

Chapman added that the vehicle has only 304 miles and has never even had the chance to get out on the road.

[…]

“With advancements in automotive technology over the past decade, it is unlikely that these vehicles offer any educational value to students,” said Chrysler.

Uh.. Doge Viper. Very education. Much fast.

via Chrysler orders college to destroy rare Dodge Viper | KDVR.com.



From nowhere, to nowhere

That’s us cyclists.

It’s called a ‘looked-but-failed-to-see-error’ and it’s the biggest danger to adult cyclists, by far. Anticipating ‘looked-but-failed-to-see errors’ is the best thing you can do for your own safety while riding a bike, by far.

Up to 93% of motorists say it is sometimes hard to see cyclists while driving, according to a survey of nearly 18,000 drivers.

More than half (55%) are often “surprised when a cyclist appears from nowhere”, the AA/Populus survey said.

Drivers in London were the most likely to look out for pedal cyclists, while drivers in Wales and Northern Ireland were least likely to do so.

The survey coincides with a national AA bike awareness campaign.

Initially, about one million free stickers will be distributed to drivers as a reminder to do a “double take” in their mirrors for cycles and motorcycles in their blind spots.

via BBC News – Motorists find cyclists hard to spot, AA survey shows.



Bill introduced in Colorado to rescue Safe Routes to School

House Bill 14-1301 will direct $3 million to keep the statewide child health and safety program alive following the end of dedicated federal funding.

The program has proven to improve safety for children around schools and to increase their daily exercise through biking and walking to school.

A broad coalition of groups is endorsing this bill along with Bicycle Colorado: LiveWell Colorado, Colorado Health Foundation, American Heart Association, Children’s Hospital Colorado.

via Mitsch Bush introduces Colorado Safe Routes to School Act | Bicycle Colorado.




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