Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Lefthand Canyon Closed to Bikes Through April
April 4, 2014, 20:26
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

And James Canyon. Kind of a weird move that is sure to raise some ire and mess up some plans.

Boulder County has closed Lefthand Canyon and James Canyon to cyclists until May 1 while crews remove major debris hazards and continue road construction there.

County officials also encouraged motorists to avoid the canyons’ roads unless travel is necessary. The closings to cyclists began on Friday and are to be in effect seven days a week.

County Transportation director George Gerstle said in a news release that the closings of Lefthand and James canyons’ roads are “due to unsafe conditions on the roadways such as steep drop-offs along the roadways from washed-away ditches and washed-away roadside shoulders, plus the increased volumes of heavy construction and road maintenance equipment along compromised roadways.”

Said Gerstle: “While these conditions are experienced by both motorists and bicyclists, bicyclists are much more likely to have their safety compromised.”

Residents needing to ride a bike in the area for basic transportation purposes can contact the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office at 303-441-3650 for a special permit.

via Lefthand, James canyons' roads closed to cyclists – Longmont Times-Call.

Bicyclists ride on “compromised roadways” all day long, so I’m not sure what their point is.

And…“While these conditions are experienced by both motorists and bicyclists, bicyclists are much more likely to have their safety compromised.” …is true for any condition.



New Paths Link Front Range Exurbs

Really fun hardpack paths.

Last month, the last major segment of the Coal Creek/Rock Creek Regional Trail was completed, bringing together a 27-mile trail network that now extends from Erie to Eldorado Springs, south of Boulder.

via 20-plus-year dream of a Boulder County prairie-to-mountain trail realized – Boulder Daily Camera.



Murder or Coincidence

Turns out the drunk who ran over and killed Michel Van Duym had a real psychological problem with cyclists. Looks real bad.

LYONS – The driver facing charges in a crash over the weekend that killed a bicyclist in Lyons spoke out against cyclists at a series of public meetings in 2010.Catherine Olguin with the Boulder County District Attorneys Office says Patrick Ward is due in court Thursday at 2 p.m.Deputies arrested Ward Saturday afternoon in Lyons on eight charges, including vehicular homicide, for the death of a Boulder bicyclist.Ward lives in Lyons and has gone on the record in that town out at least six times to express his displeasure with the cyclists who share the road.Lyons resident Colleen Dickes understands the tension between people in cars, and people on bikes.”Theres a lot of cyclists,” Dickes said. “People are always trying to avoid them. I think there is always going to be a friction.”Patrick Ward knew that friction well.Lyons Town Administrator Victoria Simonsen confirmed to 9NEWS that Ward, 69, spoke at public meetings in March, April, May, June, and July of 2010 when the town was considering a 10-year plan that included promoting cycling in Lyons.

via Driver in crash that killed cyclist in Lyons expressed growing frustration with bicyclists | 9news.com.



Bike racing is creepy

Not necessarily a positive activity in which to involve oneself.

Bike riding, however, is still the best.



New Denver/Boulder bicycling guidebook coming out

Just sent it off to the publisher. A combined road and mountain bike guide with 40 full ride descriptions and a few dozen additional mini-descriptions. Best Bike Rides Denver and Boulder. Rejected subtitle: Oh Yeah Baby.

A few places in the book:



Stage 6 is Where It’s At

Much of the course of the 2012 USA Pro Cycling Challenge seems like it was designed by Chambers of Commerce, not bike racing professionals. The Breck – CS stage, for instance, which begins with Hoosier Pass then rolls flat and downhill for a zillion miles to the finish, is almost a waste. But stage 6, Golden to Boulder (by way of Nederland and Lyons), is going to provide a lot of action and a lot of separation. There aren’t any flat roads on this route — even the flat sections are hilly. There will be some desperate moves on the final climb up Flagstaff Mountain. Great stage. Saturday. (Wednesday’s Gunnison – Aspen stage includes two big passes and should also provide some G.C. fireworks — watch that final descent into Aspen, very tricky.)


click to enlarge



2003 Plutonium Fire at Rocky Flats

That’s right, 2003.

Toward the end of Kristen Iversen’s remarkable book, Full Body Burden: Growing Up in the Nuclear Shadow of Rocky Flats, she provides a detailed account of a severe plutonium fire that happened in Building 371 at Rocky Flats in May 2003 in which Rocky Flats firefighters put their lives at risk in order to protect innocent people both on and off the site. By the time of this fire, I had for a decade been attending Rocky Flats-oriented meetings at the rate of two or three per month as a member of a number of advisory and oversight bodies focused on trying to get a responsible cleanup at  Rocky Flats. When the fire happened, those of us engaged closely in Rocky Flats matters were awaiting publication of the final legally-binding Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement by the Department of Energy and the cleanup regulators, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Despite all this close attention to what was happening at Rocky Flats, I and others around me never heard that there was another serious plutonium fire at Rocky Flats in May 2003. No one from the federal and state agencies responsible for day-to-day activities at Rocky Flats, no one from Kaiser-Hill, the cleanup contractor, no one informed us of this fire.

It might as well have been 1957 when a plutonium fire at Rocky Flats resulted in the largest single release of highly toxic plutonium to the offsite environment and the public heard not a peep. Forty-six years later, not a peep.

via Rocky Flats « LeRoyMoore's Blog.



Timmy Duggan’s Nationals Power

Lotta Joules for a Timmy.


click to enlarge

Via Velonews:

Timmy Duggan Nationals Power.



Boulder Velodrome’s Owner’s Outa Here
April 28, 2012, 23:24
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

Employees given notice. Today (Sunday) is the last day. But there is a decent chance that the ‘drome will persist under some new ownership situation.

R.I.P. Boulder Velodrome? | 303Cycling News.



Rocky Flats Plutonium Contamination Map

Via http://leroymoore.wordpress.com/2010/10/03/map-rf-contam/

Low-res scan of hard copy from a relatively recent civil case, map based on Krey-Hardy study, 1970.


click to enlarge

That’s a very large area.




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