Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Jet Fuel

via the tweetbox



Oil Companies Spending More, Producing Less

via James Hamilton via WSJ: http://econbrowser.com/archives/2014/01/big-oil-companies-spending-more-and-producing-less

costlyquestwsj
click to enlarge



USGS National Wind Turbine Map and Database

USGS Releases First-Ever National Wind Turbine Map & Database > USGS Energy Resources Program.

windfarmmap

This is just a screen shot, click link above to visit interactive map.



That’s some tricky math

Attention news reporters, editors, producers and quacking heads: The US burns about 18.5 million barrels per day, and produces 7.7.

18.5 – 7.7 is 10.8.

These numbers are from the freakin EIA itself: http://www.eia.gov/petroleum/supply/weekly/pdf/table1.pdf

No wonder the Koreans are kicking our tails in math. We get reports like this, all over the internet and on NPR:

In October, for the first time since February 1995, the U.S. produced more crude oil than it imported, the Energy Information Administration said this week.

EIA, the Energy Department’s nonpartisan statistical arm, said U.S. crude oil production averaged 7.7 million barrels per day in October while 7.6 million barrels per day were imported.

via U.S. oil output tops imports for first time since 1995 – Andrew Restuccia – POLITICO.com.

Even if that were true, all it would mean is that we still have to import half the oil we burn. But we’re not there yet, and may never be (again).



UK energy flows 2012
October 28, 2013, 06:42
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

Gotta love the Sankey Diagram.

via: UK energy flows 2012 | Energy Matters

uk_2012_sankey
click to enlarge



Air pollution and early deaths in the United States

Via MIT. Looking at 2005:

… Total combustion emissions in the U.S. account for about 200,000 (90% CI: 90,000–362,000) premature deaths per year in the U.S. due to changes in PM2.5 concentrations, and about 10,000 (90% CI: −1000 to 21,000) deaths due to changes in ozone concentrations. The largest contributors for both pollutant-related mortalities are road transportation, causing ∼53,000 (90% CI: 24,000–95,000) PM2.5-related deaths and ∼5000 (90% CI: −900 to 11,000) ozone-related early deaths per year, and power generation, causing ∼52,000 (90% CI: 23,000–94,000) PM2.5-related and ∼2000 (90% CI: −300 to 4000) ozone-related premature mortalities per year. Industrial emissions contribute to ∼41,000 (90% CI: 18,000–74,000) early deaths from PM2.5 and ∼2000 (90% CI: 0–4000) early deaths from ozone. The results are indicative of the extent to which policy measures could be undertaken in order to mitigate the impact of specific emissions from different sectors — in particular black carbon emissions from road transportation and sulfur dioxide emissions from power generation.

via Air pollution and early deaths in the United States. Part I: Quantifying the impact of major sectors in 2005.



shuttered
October 14, 2013, 08:52
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

Leaving a void of energy propaganda.

Impact of the federal government shutdown on EIA ›

As a result of the lapse in appropriations for the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the EIA.gov website and our social media channels will not be updated after 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time on Friday, October 11, 2013. Transactions submitted via the website might not be processed until appropriations are enacted; databases might not be available; and we will not be able to respond to inquiries.

Will the shutdown affect EIA\’s reports and data releases? Yes. The release of all reports and data will cease during the shutdown.

via U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).



Butane
October 13, 2013, 22:06
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Blending butane into gasoline is why gas prices fall in the fall, according to Robert Rapier. RVP = Reid vapor pressure, the higher the RVP the faster the evaporation. EPA sets limits on RVP of gasoline which are more stringent in summer months than in winter, allowing the increased blending of cheap, yet highly evaporative (word?) butane:

Butane has an RVP of 52 psi, which means pure butane is a gas at normal pressures and temperatures. But butane can be blended into gasoline, and its fractional contribution to the blend roughly determines its fractional contribution to the overall vapor pressure of the mixture. As long as the vapor pressure of the total blend does not exceed normal atmospheric pressure (again, ~14.7 psi) then butane can exist as a liquid component in a gasoline blend.

But with a vapor pressure as high as 52 psi, butane can’t make a large contribution to summer blends where the vapor pressure limit is 7.8 psi. For example, if a gasoline blend contained 10 percent butane, butane’s contribution to the vapor pressure limit is already 5.2 psi and you would still have 90 percent of the blend to go. It isn’t feasible to blend much butane into gasoline when the vapor pressure requirement is low. But when the limit increases by 5 or 7 psi, it becomes feasible to blend large quantities of butane.

Why do we care about blending butane anyway? Because it is abundant and cheap. Butane can routinely trade at a $1/gallon discount to crude oil or gasoline. Butane is a byproduct of oil refining, but is also a component of natural gas liquids (NGLs), which are condensed out during natural gas production. Given the huge expansion of natural gas production in the US, it should come as no surprise that NGL production is also on the rise.

via Why Gasoline Prices are Falling.



Shell giving up on Colorado “oil shale”

Said spokesman Martin Skrtel, speaking at Shell’s headquarters in Den Hague, “It was always just a really stupid, non-starter of an idea. You’d have to be a scientific illiterate to believe that cooking “oil shale” to create crude oil could have a positive energy balance. Still, we thought we could buy off enough legislators to create, how should we say, a conducive fiscal atmosphere that would make the scheme a profit-maker for us. But now we have abandoned even those plans…”

Ha ha that was satire. What they really said was different:

A month after Royal Dutch Shell’s U.S. subsidiary said it would pursue its oil shale research project in Colorado while selling off other oil and gas assets, the company has reversed its decision.

“There’s been a shift in our oil shale project,” spokeswoman Carolyn Tucker said Tuesday.

“The energy market has evolved since Shell first started its oil shale research project in 1981. We plan to exit our Colorado oil shale research project in order to focus on other opportunities and producing assets in our broad global portfolio,” she said in an email.

“Our current focus is to work with staff and contractors as we safely and methodically stop research activities at the site,” she said.

The announcement regarding the closure of Shell’s oil shale research and development work comes as the company announces plans to put its assets on the market across the United States, including oil and gas assets in northwestern and southeastern Colorado.

Shell on Aug. 1 reported a 60 percent drop in second-quarter results — largely due to a $2 billion write-down of its North American shale assets due to “the latest insights from exploration and appraisal drilling results and production information.”

via Shell pulling out of Colorado oil shale research project – Denver Business Journal.



miles driven in Colorado

Just like everywhere else…

DENVER – A new report from the Colorado Public Interest Research Foundations shows Coloradans have cut their per-person driving miles by 11.4 percent since 2005.

via Report: Double-digit drop in driving in Colorado | 9news.com.

Since 2005. But is it headed back up compared to last year?




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