Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


This is Vaughters’ story
December 10, 2013, 19:49
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…to explain why a team stacked with old dopers (who all claim to have stopped using just about exactly however many years ago matches the statute of limitations, by zany coincidence) has been so successful while doping is still an acknowledged issue in the sport:

Sponsorship keeps the whole operation going, And once you had that, the doping started to stop, the level came down a little bit and all of a sudden we started winning races.

via Colorado Cyclist Jonathan Vaughters dishes on The Armstrong Lie, doping and Lance.

THEY ARE JUST THAT GOOD FOLKS.

Are you buying that?



Tour de France Haiku: Stage 9
July 8, 2013, 09:04
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Two thousand seven
After which nobody doped
Before which all did



VeloNews hails Di Luca defeat as good for cycling

This strikes me as hypocritical and simple-minded stuff from Neal Rogers, cheering Di Luca’s getting caught by young unknown riders who have yet to be caught in any doping dragnets.

Garmin is packed full of “riders with controversial pasts.” Let’s see if he has the same venom for them as they defend their Giro title.

While his move was bold, that Di Luca was unable to hold his attack on Tuesday is encouraging.

The day when the pro peloton is clear of suspicion will likely never materialize. However, the day when the peloton is clear of riders with controversial pasts may be only a few years away.

via Commentary: Why Battaglin’s Giro stage win matters.

Translation: Di Luca’s defeat helps us pretend that they’re not all still doping.



‘prior to 2008′

This is what those ‘amnesty’ deals will look like for pro riders:

Under the pact, Dutch riders and staffers have until April 1 to come clean on their respective pasts [but not completely clean, of course]. Riders or staffers who confess to doping practices prior to 2008 will be issued six-month bans and fined two months’ wages. More severe bans of up to four years would be imposed for those who don’t confess during the amnesty window, but are later exposed.

And if anybody confesses to doping after 2008, the entire world will explode. So don’t do that, riders.

This whole thing is completely ridiculous. Stick a fork in it.

via Velonews: Boogerd’s confession causes stir in Dutch teams.



Jaksche
February 12, 2013, 11:01
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Jaksche said it was “riders who always end up paying.”

“Cycling is not a mafia, it’s a sport run by unscrupulous people,” he said. “Now the same people who were behind doping would later point their finger at us.”

via VeloNews: Jaksche leaves no doubt in Puerto testimony; Basso says he never transfused blood.



Oh, I forgot about boxing

On Tuesday, Fuentes openly admitted his client list included other sports beyond cycling, naming athletics, tennis, soccer and even boxing.

On Wednesday, Fuentes offered to name all of his clients, saying that he remembered every codename as well as indicating he had a ledger locked away in a safe back on the Canary Islands.

When attorneys representing WADA and CONI both pressed Fuentes for more names, the judge hit the brakes.

There was no anti-doping law on the books during the May 2006 raids and Spanish courts have refused to widen the legal net to anything beyond questions of endangering public health, which could result in minor fines, suspended jail terms and the suspension of medical licenses for Fuentes and his sister.

That interpretation has infuriated many who view the Puerto case as nothing more than a farce.

via VeloNews: Operacion Puerto judge restricting case to health issue.

But at least that cat’s out of the bag, which must make some people extremely uncomfortable: Doping exists in all high-level sports when it provides an advantage. Doping is the hallmark of industrialized sports, where the pursuit of big money and self-preservation of careers by those in the front office is placed far above any sort of integrity, and the health of individual athletes doesn’t even register as anything other than a business concern.

EDIT: Of course I understand that individual athletes choose (more or less) to use these substances for their own selfish reasons. But these athletes are just trying to make childhood dreams come true. And the athletes are the only individuals to suffer consequences from doping. The industry hiding behind them, the UCI officials, team coaches, owners, managers, and sponsors never seem to face any real consequences for the doping that they also profit upon (other than the occasional out of court settlement to a pissed off rider). The worst dopers are wearing suits, not lycra.



#stilldoping
January 25, 2013, 06:24
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Tweet from Vaughters:

@Vaughters: @Velo_Vicar So common, that during my time as a rider on a div 1 team, I cannot think of any div1 rider who never doped, outside of Bassons.

That Was Then, This is Now. So clean now. Blood so pure.



Carmichael into the meat grinder

Took em long enough.

Strock, who was 17 in 1990, said later he was given pills and injections daily and told they were “vitamins.”

After a race in Washington in 1990, Wenzel took Strock to Carmichael’s motel room, according to the book “From Lance to Landis” by David Walsh, where Carmichael  appeared with a hard-sided briefcase.

“Inside were pills, ampoules and syringes. Selecting an ampoule and syringe, Carmichael inserted the needle into the ampoule, drew some liquid and injected Strock in the upper part of the buttocks,” Walsh wrote. Strock said he was told the injection was “extract of cortisone” — a substance that does not exist.

Stock later saw Carmichael at other races with the briefcase, Walsh wrote.

In 2000, Strock and Kaiter sued USA Cycling in Colorado, claiming the drugs had ruined their health. Latta brought a similar suit in Oregon.

USA Cycling in 2006 paid Strock and Kaiter $250,000 each, according to Walsh.

Carmichael kept his name out of the lawsuit, according to Walsh, by paying Strock an amount believed to be $20,000.

“Carmichael agreed to settle very quickly,” Wenzel told a Danish newspaper in 2006. “In hindsight that was probably a smart idea.”

via Questions remain about doping ties to Armstrong's coach | carmichael, armstrong, coach – Colorado Springs Gazette, CO.

What’s more evil than a coach injecting a kid athlete with some illicit rocket fuel and lying to him about what’s in the syringe?

Kudos to Dave Phillips at CS Gazette for getting into Carmichael’s junk stack.



What a bust

Lance, instead of going all righteous scorched earth on the corrupt UCI and the peloton weasels who all claim to have magically sworn off EPO at the same time, joined his former friends in trying to convince the world that cycling suddenly flipped a 180 in 2005-2006 and entered a fresh n’ clean era of high integrity racing. Matt Beaudin at VeloNews doesn’t get it either:

Lance Armstrong this week fessed up to doping during his seven Tour de France wins, but it’s the things he didn’t say, the things he may have lied about still, that may haunt him yet…..

It was reported in the run-up to the interview that Armstrong considered outing friends and giving up the Union Cycliste Internationale. He did no such thing, and offered little meaningful assistance to a sport that’s suffering from an image problem, in large part due to the culture over which he presided, and helped further with aggressive pursuit of anyone even hinting at talking.

Over nearly three hours and two evenings, the fallen Tour de France star said more in a few words (all yeses, admitting to doping, and doping in every Tour win) than he had in a decade, but he left many scratching their heads, particularly at the notion that his comeback in 2009, during which he finished third at the Tour de France, was ridden on bread and water when blood data said otherwise.

“The last time I crossed that line was 2005,” Armstrong told Winfrey. On night two of a two-part interview, Armstrong said that in conversations with his former wife, Kristin, she made him promise not to use performance enhancing drugs if he were to return to the peloton.

“She said to me, ‘you can do it, under one condition: That you never cross that line again.’ And I said, ‘you got a deal.’ And I never would have betrayed that with her,” he said. “It’s a serious — it was a serious ask, it was a serious commitment.”

That commitment, however, has been refuted by math. In the 2009 Tour, Armstrong’s samples showed fewer red blood cells over a three-week stage race than would normally occur, indicating he was injecting supplemental blood.

Scientists noted that Armstrong’s blood has a less than one a million chance of naturally appearing in such a fashion. Nearly 40 samples were taken over the course of Armstrong’s comeback, providing a baseline for a biological passport.

“The sport was very clean,” Armstrong told Winfrey, citing the very biological passport that ensnared him. “I didn’t expect to get third. I expected to win, like I always expected. And at the end, I said to myself, ‘I just got beat by two guys who were better.’”

If he’s lying, the question is why. …

via Velonews.com: Zip the lips: After hours of TV, too many Armstrong questions remain.



The Landis whistleblower lawsuit

Is here IN ALL ITS GLORY (google docs pdf).

Taking blood out, putting blood back in, hidden refrigerators, ball patches, the whole nine yards.

Of course Floyd prior to singing like the canary had been telling everyone how clean he was, begging us to believe he was railroaded by the lab, and asking for money from his loyal fans for his defense. The Floyd Fairness Fund. And wrote a book called Positively False. Now he stands to make a boatload of cash as a Relator in a fed whistleblower case.

The allegations are probably true, and I maintain that Floyd’s win in the Tour was one of the greatest of all time, illicit though it was, but Floyd is roughly as credible as a goose poop.




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