Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


NPR repeats false fracking narratives

As NPR’s Tom Gjelten reports:

“Petroleum engineers have always known about the untapped underground oil in the United States, but it was unreachable, trapped in tight shale rock. Then the engineers figured out how to crack the rock. Hydraulic fracturing — fracking — got that ‘tight oil’ finally flowing in places like North Dakota.”

via Huge Boost In U.S. Oil Output Set To Transform Global Market : The Two-Way : NPR.

Wrong, Tom. The tight oil has been ‘reachable’ for several decades, it was just such an expensive process that it made no sense to do it when oil was cheap — a money-losing proposition. Now, all the cheap oil is gone, and out comes the ‘unconventional’ oil.

Gjelten also said that the decline in oil consumption in the US was due to efficiency (check the VMT chart Tom). There was no mention of depletion of existing fields, or the striking decline rate of fracked shale wells. And he reported that cheaper oil is just over the horizon.

Would it hurt Mr. Gjelten to do just a tiny bit of research on the topic of his reports so he doesn’t sound like a complete idiot?



Big Oil vs. Big Gas

Kochs don’t like govt. picking winners and losers — especially if the losers are them.

The idea of using the tax code to spur conversion of trucking fleets has support from many Democrats and Republicans, and enjoys some powerful backers.

They include billionaire energy magnate T. Boone Pickens, Reid and President Obama, who touted his own natural-gas vehicles plan in a Wednesday speech. (A White House spokesman couldn’t be reached for comment on the Senate proposal specifically.)

But groups influential in GOP circles including Heritage Action (an arm of the Heritage Foundation), the Club for Growth, Americans for Tax Reform and Americans for Prosperity have long been battling the natural-gas plan.

via Natural-gas tax fight between Koch, Pickens reaches Senate floor – The Hill's E2-Wire.



Race officials abscond with anti-fracking banner at Tour Down Under
January 29, 2012, 05:15
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , ,

Now see if I didn’t just describe this here video.

Not too often that we run across something with both fracking and bike content.



Texas Railroad Commission says there’s enough water for Eagle Ford fracking
January 28, 2012, 05:00
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , ,

According to http://www.rigzone.com/news/article.asp?a_id=114624&hmpn=1

But check the math. The figures below come from the article.

– 540,000 acre feet in the aquifer when the fracking began.

– 30,000 acre feet per year used by fracking at peak demand.

– fracking supposedly accounts for only 6% of total aquifer usage. Agriculture takes 65%.

This implies that the entire aquifer would be consumed within a few years.

Even if the frack water amounted to 25% of water usage, the aquifer would be gone in under five years. I have seen claims of up to 40% frack water usage in S. Texas — if that’s true, and the other figures are true, the aquifer would be gone in seven or eight years.

In any case, something’s not adding up here.



Shortage of fracking sand

…a.k.a. proppant. Didn’t see that one coming, Baker Hughes didn’t either apparently.

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-01-24/baker-hughes-says-fracking-shortages-hurt-profit-margin.html



Fugitive methane

A new story in Scientific American by Frischetti. Fracking could release large quantities of methane into the atmosphere, accelerating global warming.



Public comments on NY hydrofracking were 10-to-1 against

…with one day left in comment period.

http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/article/20120110/NEWS01/301100008/-Hydrofracking-energizes-New-York-residents?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|PoughkeepsieJournal.com|s




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