Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Typhoon Wipha
October 15, 2013, 21:48
Filed under: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , ,

via ex-skf: http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2013/10/large-and-strong-typhoon-no26.html

wipha
click to enlarge

Sorry about the ad below if there is one and sorry about the fact that the spent fuel pool might blow over in the typhoon and make the northern hemisphere uninhabitable.



Tanks for the Memories

Seems pretty clear at this point. In the future all of our time, energy and material resources will go toward making tanks to store an ever-increasing amount of radioactive wastewater that we have dumped in desperation onto melted reactor cores and ‘spent’ nuclear fuel, and which has leaked out of some other tank or tanks. Unfortunately, though we can look forward to full employment, and lots of good times with our colleagues down at the tank factory, the Tank Game is un-winnable.

Did Kafka write this passage:

Tokyo Electric Power Co. previously said two of seven huge underground tanks at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant had been leaking since Saturday if not earlier.

The latest leak involves a tank that was being used to take water from one of the two that were leaking, TEPCO spokesman Masayuki Ono said. …

TEPCO has halted the transfer of water to the third tank, diverting it to a fourth tank that remains intact. Two of the seven tanks are currently unused.

Ono said TEPCO has decided to stop using the two most damaged of the three leaking tanks as soon as they are emptied, but will use the other because of a tank shortage.

via More radioactive water leaking from storage tanks at Japanese nuclear plant damaged by tsunami – The Washington Post.



American babies and Fukushima

http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=28599

Mangano and Sherman, “Elevated airborne beta levels in Pacific/West Coast US States and trends in hypothyroidism among newborns after the Fukushima nuclear meltdown” Open Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 3, Number 1, March 2013.

1.2. Exposure to Radioactive Iodine as a Factor
in Congenital Hypothyroidism

Another potential environmental risk factor is prenatal
exposure to radioactive iodine isotopes, which seek out
the susceptible fetal thyroid gland. For decades radioactive
iodine has been recognized to cause adverse effects
(including hypothyroidism) to the thyroid gland. The
fetal thyroid, the first glandular structure to appear in the
human embryo [14], begins to concentrate iodine and
produce thyroid hormones by the 70th day of gestation
[15]. In the mid-1950s, during the period of atmospheric
nuclear weapons tests, I-131 produced by fission was
first detected in the adult human thyroid [16,17]. I-131
concentrations were calculated to be about 10 times
higher in the human fetal thyroid vs. the human adult or
hog thyroid [18], and maximum elevations in fetal thy-
roids were detected approximately one month after nuclear
explosions [19]. The main path of exposure to shortlived
isotopes such as I-131 is via dairy products due to
radioactive fallout deposition on forage [20].

[…]

It gets all over the grass, the cows eat the grass, and the I-131 and Cesium are thus concentrated in cheese and milk.

…Large amounts of fallout disseminated worldwide from the meltdowns in four reactors at the Fukushima-Dai-ichi plant in Japan beginning March 11, 2011 included radioiodine isotopes. Just days after the meltdowns, I-131 concentrations in US precipitation was measured up to 211 times above normal. Highest levels of I-131 and airborne gross beta were documented in the five US States on the Pacific Ocean. The number of congenital hypothyroid cases in these five states from March 17-December 31, 2011 was 16% greater than for the same period in 2010, compared to a 3% decline in 36 other US States (p < 0.03). The greatest divergence in these two groups (+28%) occurred in the period March 17-June 30 (p < 0.04). …



Melted blob

Not unlike my soul.

The EPA says 423 of the samples contained man-made radioactive contaminants exceeding background levels. Most of the contaminants were cesium-137 and strontium-90, both powerful carcinogenic substances.

Most samples exceeding background levels were found in the surface soil at locations known to be contaminated, including where the partial meltdown occurred on the morning of July 14, 1959. Details of that incident, which spewed colorless and odorless gases into the atmosphere, were not disclosed until 1979, when a group of UCLA students discovered documents and photographs that referred to a problem at the site involving a “melted blob.”

via Radioactive hot spots remain at former research facility's site – latimes.com.

I’ll tell you what though. If I ever owned a nuclear reactor, and it went all meltdown and everything, I would inform the people living in the surrounding areas. So they could make arrangements and whatnot.



Heavy Water at Point Lepreau

“Heavy water…” Doesn’t sound so dangerous does it?

About 300 litres of tritiated heavy water spilled on May 21 when a valve opened too soon during pressure testing at the plant.

NB Power crews were testing the system that transfers heat from the reactor up to steam powered turbines as part of preparations to restart the plant when they overpressurized the system.

Poor planning, training led to leak

Rzentkowski said poor planning, training and human error led to the leak, which officials have said was contained in a sealed room and cleaned up without endangering staff or the environment.

“Supervisors were not trained in the operation of the test equipment. Supervisors could not provide active oversight and guidance over the test,” said Razentkowski.

There were two previous spills at Lepreau.

On Dec. 13, less than six litres of heavy water splashed to the floor, forcing an evacuation of the building.

The following day, NB Power issued a statement saying that three weeks earlier another spill had occurred. About 23 barrels of water laced with the toxic chemical hydrazine was released into the Bay of Fundy.

Both incidents occurred as part of preparations for restarting the plant.

via Nuclear watchdog unable to closely monitor Point Lepreau – New Brunswick – CBC News.



Leak found at Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant last week

While we’re on the subject of super old and leaky nuke plants. This plant’s near Toledo, and is also up for a controversial license renewal.

During the performance of MODE 3 engineering walkdown inspections in accordance with procedure DB-PF-03010 (ASME Section III, Class 1 and 2), with the RCS at Normal Operating Temperature and Pressure, a pressure boundary leak was identified on the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) 1-2 1st seal cavity vent line upstream weld of 3/4 inch small bore pipe socketweld at a 90 degree elbow between the RCP pump and valve RC-407 (1st Seal Cavity Vent Isolation). The plant was in MODE 3 at Normal Operating Pressure and Normal Operating Temperature (NOP/NOT) for the inspections.

“The plant entered Technical Specification (TS) Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) 3.4.13, ‘RCS Operational Leakage,’ Condition B and procedure DB-OP-02522. ‘Small RCS Leaks,’ abnormal operating procedure. Plant cooldown to comply with LCO 3.4.13, Condition B, Required Action B.2 is in progress. The cause and resolution are under evaluation.

via Leak found at Davis Besse Nuclear Power Plant during restart from month-long outage | Enformable.



50-mile radius around Palisades nuke plant

…which is leaking, perhaps exploding, etc.

The 41-year-old plant’s license was due to expire, but in 2007 the NRC granted a 20-year extension.


click to enlarge
Via the Palisade license-renewal application (pdf): http://www.nrc.gov/reactors/operating/licensing/renewal/applications/palisades/palisades_er.pdf




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