Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Salem nuclear plant

While worriers worried about Oyster Creek, several plants in the path of the storm experienced “events.” Salem: atmospheric steam dump…

NRC: Current Event Notification Report for October 30, 2012

MANUAL REACTOR TRIP FROM 100% POWER

“This report if being made under the requirements of 10 CFR 50.72(b)(2)(iv)(B), Actuation of the Reactor Protection System While Critical, except preplanned, and under the requirements of 10 CFR 50.72(b)(3)(iv)(A), Valid Actuation of Listed System, except preplanned.

“Salem Unit 1 was operating at 100% reactor power when a loss of 4 condenser circulators required a manual reactor trip in accordance with station procedures. The cause of the 4 circulators being removed from service was due to a combination of high river level and detritus from Hurricane Sandy’s transit.

“All control rods inserted. A subsequent loss of the 2 remaining circulators required transition of decay heat removal from condenser steam dumps to the 11-14 MS10s (atmospheric steam dump). Decay heat removal is from the 11/12 Aux Feed Pumps to all 4 steam generators via the 11-14 MS10s. 11/12/13 AFW pumps started due to low level on all steam generators due to shrink from full power operation (this is a normal response). All safety related equipment functioned as expected. No one has been injured. As an additional note, Hurricane Sandy had recently moved past artificial island. Salem Unit 1 is currently in Mode 3. Salem Unit 2 reactor is currently in its 2R19 refueling outage and is shutdown and defueled with no fuel movement in progress.”

via NRC: Current Event Notification Report for October 30, 2012.



What happens when the water’s too warm

Millstone nuke plant shuts down, unable to cool reactors with excessively warm seawater; Coldstone Creamery closes early, unable to cool iced treats with excessively warm coldstones.

Unit 2 of Millstone Power Station has occasionally shut for maintenance or other issues, but in its 37-year history it has never gone down due to excessively warm water, spokesman Ken Holt said on Monday.

Water from Long Island Sound is used to cool key components of the plant and is discharged back into the sound. The water cannot be warmer than 75 degrees and following the hottest July on record has been averaging 1.7 degrees above the limit, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission said.

via Warm Seawater Forces Conn. Nuclear Plant Shutdown – ABC News.



Heavy Water at Point Lepreau

“Heavy water…” Doesn’t sound so dangerous does it?

About 300 litres of tritiated heavy water spilled on May 21 when a valve opened too soon during pressure testing at the plant.

NB Power crews were testing the system that transfers heat from the reactor up to steam powered turbines as part of preparations to restart the plant when they overpressurized the system.

Poor planning, training led to leak

Rzentkowski said poor planning, training and human error led to the leak, which officials have said was contained in a sealed room and cleaned up without endangering staff or the environment.

“Supervisors were not trained in the operation of the test equipment. Supervisors could not provide active oversight and guidance over the test,” said Razentkowski.

There were two previous spills at Lepreau.

On Dec. 13, less than six litres of heavy water splashed to the floor, forcing an evacuation of the building.

The following day, NB Power issued a statement saying that three weeks earlier another spill had occurred. About 23 barrels of water laced with the toxic chemical hydrazine was released into the Bay of Fundy.

Both incidents occurred as part of preparations for restarting the plant.

via Nuclear watchdog unable to closely monitor Point Lepreau – New Brunswick – CBC News.




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