Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


More Misplaced Efforts on “Bike Safety”

Capt. Jack Danilecki of the Boston police, former commander of the tactical bicycle unit, said that five cyclists were killed in Boston last year. Police are taking an initial step to address the problem by issuing reminders — in the form of $20 tickets — to cyclists who run red lights and stop signs that they are legally bound to obey the rules of the road.

via How to protect cyclists | Harvard Gazette.



Denver City Council will focus on bike-pedestrian safety in 2014

Not yet sure what that means. Could be good or bad, probably a combination of good and bad.

Denver City Council met for several hours Friday morning at the scenic Boettcher Mansion atop Lookout Mountain, agreeing that pedestrian and bicycle safety should be among the city’s the top budget priorities for 2014.

[…]

Recent high-profile hit-and-run crashes that have killed pedestrians and increasing interest in creating a more walkable and bike-able Denver prompted the council to order the budget office focus on improving the city’s pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure.

via Denver City Council sets budget priorities for 2014.



hit-and-run city

Denver’s traffic not following national trends.

Denver’s auto-pedestrian accidents were up 46 percent for the first eight weeks of 2013 over the previous two years. Another grim statistic also stands out: Last year, the city had 13 hit-and-run fatalities, more than the previous three years combined.

[…]

After two years of averaging about 31 auto-pedestrian incidents a month, the average jumped to 44 a month in January and February, according to Denver police statistics.

Hit-and-run cases averaged 8.5 a month in January and February — after 4.8 per month in 2011 and 6.1 in 2012.

[…]

Over the past decade, about 1,600 accidents involving pedestrians or cyclists were reported every year, according to a study by the Denver Regional Council of Governments.

In the 10-county region, 17 percent of all fatalities were pedestrians, and 3 percent were cyclists.

via Spike in Denver's auto-pedestrian cases has officials seeking answers – The Denver Post.

These “jumps” are based on a mere two months’ of accidents. Gotta keep an eye out to see if it continues.



Could be ‘just one of those things’

Significantly more bicyclists killed in car-bike crashes, significantly fewer injured in car-bike crashes… Does this make some kind of sense?

nonoccupants2011
click to enlarge

via NHTSA 2011 Motor Vehicle Crashes Overview (pdf): http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811701.pdf



What kids do to bike accident stats

Especially in suburban areas. Here’s Mesa, AZ 2005.

http://www.cityofmesa.org/transportation/pdf/bike_analysis.pdf

via The Industrialized Cyclist Research Page


click to enlarge



More on “Teschke Study:” Streetcar tracks blamed in one-third of Toronto bike accident E.R. visits

An impressive tally.

However, 96 of the 690 crashes studied in downtown Toronto and Vancouver directly involved streetcar or train tracks. Eighty-seven of those accidents were in Toronto, accounting for 31.5 per cent of all bike accidents in the city that led to an injury that required a visit to an emergency department.

via Streetcar tracks blamed in one-third of Toronto bike accidents.



“The Teschke Study”

Objectives. We compared cycling injury risks of 14 route types and other route infrastructure features.

Methods. We recruited 690 city residents injured while cycling in Toronto or Vancouver, Canada. A case-crossover design compared route infrastructure at each injury site to that of a randomly selected control site from the same trip.

Results. Of 14 route types, cycle tracks had the lowest risk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.02, 0.54), about one ninth the risk of the reference: major streets with parked cars and no bike infrastructure. Risks on major streets were lower without parked cars (adjusted OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.41, 0.96) and with bike lanes (adjusted OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.29, 1.01). Local streets also had lower risks (adjusted OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.84). Other infrastructure characteristics were associated with increased risks: streetcar or train tracks (adjusted OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.8, 5.1), downhill grades (adjusted OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.7, 3.1), and construction (adjusted OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.3, 2.9).

Conclusions. The lower risks on quiet streets and with bike-specific infrastructure along busy streets support the route-design approach used in many northern European countries. Transportation infrastructure with lower bicycling injury risks merits public health support to reduce injuries and promote cycling. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print October 18, 2012: e1-e8. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2012.300762)

via American Public Health Association – Route Infrastructure and the Risk of Injuries to Bicyclists: A Case-Crossover Study.




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