Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Army sprayed St. Louis neighborhood with radiological weapons in the 1950s and 1960s

And you thought the ‘chem-trails’ people were nutz, didn’t you?

Strong evidence of mixing radium in with the zinc cadmium sulfide.

via http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2012/oct/04/report-army-tested-chemical-weapons-st-louis-1950s/

The first line of the story contradicts its headline.

In the mid-1950s, and again a decade later, the Army used motorized blowers atop a low-income housing high-rise, at schools and from the backs of station wagons to send a potentially dangerous compound into the already-hazy air in predominantly black areas of St. Louis.

“…at schools…” Your tax dollars at work.

Local officials were told at the time that the government was testing a smoke screen that could shield St. Louis from aerial observation in case the Russians attacked.

[…]

The Army has admitted only to using blowers to spread the chemical, but Brindell recalled a summer day playing baseball with other kids in the street when a squadron of green Army planes flew close to the ground and dropped a powdery substance. She went inside, washed it off her face and arms, then went back out to play.

Over the years, Brindell has battled four types of cancer — breast, thyroid, skin and uterine.

[…]

Martino-Taylor decided to research the testing for her doctoral thesis at the University of Missouri. She believes the St. Louis study was linked to the Manhattan Atomic Bomb Project and a small group of scientists from that project who were developing radiological weapons. A congressional study in 1993 confirmed radiological testing in Tennessee and parts of the West during the Cold War.

“There are strong lines of evidence that there was a radiological component to the St. Louis study,” Martino-Taylor said.

“Parts of the west?” Which parts?

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