Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Fukushima News Downplayed Health Concerns and Still Does

Oh yeah, that Fukushima thing. I remember that.

Four years after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the disaster no longer dominates U.S. news headlines, though the disabled plant continues to pour three hundred tons of radioactive water into the ocean each day. Homes, schools and businesses in the Japanese prefecture are uninhabitable, and will likely be so forever. Yet the U.S. media has dropped the story while public risks remain.A new analysis by American University sociology professor Celine Marie Pascale finds that U.S. news media coverage of the disaster largely minimized health risks to the general population.

Pascale analyzed more than 2,000 news articles from four major U.S. outlets following the disasters occurrence March 11, 2011 through the second anniversary on March 11, 2013. Only 6 percent of the coverage—129 articles—focused on health risks to the public in Japan or elsewhere. Human risks were framed, instead, in terms of workers in the disabled nuclear plant.

via Fukushima News.



Fukushima Radioactive Aerosol Dispersal

NOAA’s HYSPLIT model shows clouds of highly radioactive Cesium wafting over the US after Fuku blew sky high. Only one month’s worth shown.

To see animation:

http://www.sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=332

fukuemissions

radiokey



Radionuclide contamination in Fukushima and adjacent prefectures

The outside annual radiation dose due to the radionuclides from the Fukushima accident is estimated to be 10 mSv in Naka-Dori, 40 mSv in Iitate, 0.2 mSv in the region between northern Ibaraki and eastern Saitama, and 2 mSv in southern Ibaraki and northern Chiba prefectures (note that the present estimate does not include the doses from short-lived radionuclides). No internal dose contribution is assumed in these estimations.

via PubMed: Assessment of individual radionuclide distributions from the Fukushima nuclear accident covering central-east Japan.