Industrialized Cyclist Notepad

Right-side hazards
November 19, 2015, 08:50
Filed under: Uncategorized

On city streets with lots of driveways, alleys, parking and intersections, most of the look-but-failed-to-see errors that affect bicyclists originate from the right side of the road. That’s not to belittle the danger from the left (particularly from left-turning drivers) or behind, which tends to produce more injurious crashes.

As far as I know the best place to start is still the North Carolina Bicycle Crash Data Tool, but here’s a sampling of other stuff from my online bin of bike safety studies ( ):


Ralph Wessels’ study of Washington state police reports 88-93



Fort Collins ’07-’09 all roads



Hunter et al 6-state study ’96


Americans Driving More Than Ever Before

After a few years of sweet reversal of the VMT (Vehicle Miles Traveled) chart, then a few years of bouncing along what looked like a New Normal, things have turned around in a big way. Cheap gas being the primary culprit. Back to our old ways just like that, and making up for lost time.


Family Biking: The Parent’s Guide to Safe Cycling

Christie and I both worked on this one. The book includes a comprehensive buyer’s guide for family biking Things like bakfietsen, cargo trikes, longtails, child seats, trailers, balance bikes and kids’ helmets, with in-depth, research-based commentary on safety issues. Is transporting your kid in a child seat as dangerous as people say? Are trailers safe in traffic? When is a child ready to ride by herself?

In answering these questions and dozens of others, we came across some surprising facts. For instance, we learned that approximately half of the kids’ injuries associated with bike seats occur when loading or unloading the child from the seat. We also found out, much to our dismay, that helmet makers have been allowed by federal regulators to make kids’ helmets with the same material that adult helmets are made of, even though kids’ heads are so much lighter—meaning the foam in kids’ helmets almost never compresses to soften the blow when they crash. In our opinion, it’s a scandal and needs to be fixed, by the helmet companies and the CPSC. We hope this book will help make that happen.

I promise this book will be interesting and useful for anyone who rides with their kid(s), or anyone who wants to.

Available now for just 14$ at Amazon:


To check out the rest of my books see

Boulder right-sizing bike-lane project moves forward, sort of

Turns out that new street treatments on Folsom will not continue through the part of town where they are most needed.

A controversial plan to remove vehicle lanes to allow for wider bike lanes on four major streets in Boulder will move forward on three of them: Folsom Street, Iris Avenue and 63rd Street.

A few minutes before midnight, after hearing testimony from roughly 80 people, the City Council voted 7-2 to support the “right-sizing” plan that was developed as a pilot program as part of the Living Laboratory bike facilities project.

via Boulder right-sizing bike-lane project moves forward on 3 of 4 streets.

Reporter proves Biological Passport basically useless

…except for PR purposes.

“We’d been hearing that the athletes biological passport, which is the latest tool in the fight against doping, is not quite as sensitive as people might want to think,” he says. “What we decided to do, with me being an amateur athlete, is put this passport to the test.”

He writes:It would last for 14 weeks, and have three phases. I would have my blood taken once a week and sent off to a lab for analysis. A doctor would monitor my health throughout.Baseline – weeks 1-3: establish what my “normal” blood levels are. Performance test at end of week 3Loading – weeks 4-10: undergo a program of between 2-3 micro-dose injections of EPO per week. Each injection would be supervised. Performance test at end of week 10Washout – weeks 11-14: critical phase of the experiment, when I stop taking EPO and the passport is meant to be most effective.The plan was to collect 14 blood analyses and have them put through the biological passport software to see if it would catch me.

But he wasnt testing to see if EPO works. He knows it works. He wanted to see if he could get away with doping. He took blood samples each week and sent them to have them analyzed and placed into a biological passport. “And the truth is, I was able to sail through the tests. I got away with it,” he says.

via Reporter dopes to show how easy it is to evade drug tests | Public Radio International.

Oil CEO Pressured Oklahoma U. Dean to Fire Scientists

…who studied (and found) the link between fracking waste disposal wells and earthquakes. Hamm is CEO of Continental Oil.

Hamm, the billionaire founder and chief executive officer of Oklahoma City-based Continental Resources, is a major donor to the university, which is the home of the Oklahoma Geological Survey. He has vigorously disputed the notion that he tried to pressure the surveys scientists. “Im very approachable, and dont think Im intimidating,” Hamm was quoted as saying in an interview with EnergyWire, an industry publication, that was published on May 11. “I dont try to push anybody around.”

Yet an e-mail obtained from the university by Bloomberg News via a public records request says Hamm used a blunt approach during a 90-minute meeting last year with the dean whose department includes the geological survey.”Mr. Hamm is very upset at some of the earthquake reporting to the point that he would like to see select OGS staff dismissed,” wrote Larry Grillot, the dean of the universitys Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, in a July 16, 2014, e-mail to colleagues at the university. Hamm also expressed an interest in joining a search committee charged with finding a new director for the geological survey, according to Grillots e-mail. And, the dean wrote, Hamm indicated that he would be “visiting with Governor [Mary] Fallin on the topic of moving the OGS out of the University of Oklahoma.”

via Oil CEO Wanted University Quake Scientists Dismissed: Deans E-Mail – Bloomberg Business.

Ben Serotta designed the new Citibikes

Interview on Streetsblog:

How do you think the new bike design will affect the customer experience?

Folks know me as the maker of high-end custom bike frames. This new project has allowed me to design a bike that’s custom-made to suit everyone.

All of the thought and planning that went into the new design will hopefully mean that the bikes spend more time on the street and less time in the shop. That means more bikes available for our customers.

via America’s Biggest Bike-Share Operator Now Makes Its Own Bikes | Streetsblog New York City.


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