Industrialized Cyclist Notepad


Boulder right-sizing bike-lane project moves forward, sort of

Turns out that new street treatments on Folsom will not continue through the part of town where they are most needed.

A controversial plan to remove vehicle lanes to allow for wider bike lanes on four major streets in Boulder will move forward on three of them: Folsom Street, Iris Avenue and 63rd Street.

A few minutes before midnight, after hearing testimony from roughly 80 people, the City Council voted 7-2 to support the “right-sizing” plan that was developed as a pilot program as part of the Living Laboratory bike facilities project.

via Boulder right-sizing bike-lane project moves forward on 3 of 4 streets.



Reporter proves Biological Passport basically useless

…except for PR purposes.

“We’d been hearing that the athletes biological passport, which is the latest tool in the fight against doping, is not quite as sensitive as people might want to think,” he says. “What we decided to do, with me being an amateur athlete, is put this passport to the test.”

He writes:It would last for 14 weeks, and have three phases. I would have my blood taken once a week and sent off to a lab for analysis. A doctor would monitor my health throughout.Baseline – weeks 1-3: establish what my “normal” blood levels are. Performance test at end of week 3Loading – weeks 4-10: undergo a program of between 2-3 micro-dose injections of EPO per week. Each injection would be supervised. Performance test at end of week 10Washout – weeks 11-14: critical phase of the experiment, when I stop taking EPO and the passport is meant to be most effective.The plan was to collect 14 blood analyses and have them put through the biological passport software to see if it would catch me.

But he wasnt testing to see if EPO works. He knows it works. He wanted to see if he could get away with doping. He took blood samples each week and sent them to have them analyzed and placed into a biological passport. “And the truth is, I was able to sail through the tests. I got away with it,” he says.

via Reporter dopes to show how easy it is to evade drug tests | Public Radio International.



Oil CEO Pressured Oklahoma U. Dean to Fire Scientists

…who studied (and found) the link between fracking waste disposal wells and earthquakes. Hamm is CEO of Continental Oil.

Hamm, the billionaire founder and chief executive officer of Oklahoma City-based Continental Resources, is a major donor to the university, which is the home of the Oklahoma Geological Survey. He has vigorously disputed the notion that he tried to pressure the surveys scientists. “Im very approachable, and dont think Im intimidating,” Hamm was quoted as saying in an interview with EnergyWire, an industry publication, that was published on May 11. “I dont try to push anybody around.”

Yet an e-mail obtained from the university by Bloomberg News via a public records request says Hamm used a blunt approach during a 90-minute meeting last year with the dean whose department includes the geological survey.”Mr. Hamm is very upset at some of the earthquake reporting to the point that he would like to see select OGS staff dismissed,” wrote Larry Grillot, the dean of the universitys Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy, in a July 16, 2014, e-mail to colleagues at the university. Hamm also expressed an interest in joining a search committee charged with finding a new director for the geological survey, according to Grillots e-mail. And, the dean wrote, Hamm indicated that he would be “visiting with Governor [Mary] Fallin on the topic of moving the OGS out of the University of Oklahoma.”

via Oil CEO Wanted University Quake Scientists Dismissed: Deans E-Mail – Bloomberg Business.



Ben Serotta designed the new Citibikes

Interview on Streetsblog:

How do you think the new bike design will affect the customer experience?

Folks know me as the maker of high-end custom bike frames. This new project has allowed me to design a bike that’s custom-made to suit everyone.

All of the thought and planning that went into the new design will hopefully mean that the bikes spend more time on the street and less time in the shop. That means more bikes available for our customers.

via America’s Biggest Bike-Share Operator Now Makes Its Own Bikes | Streetsblog New York City.



Dan Koeppel on the Pasadena-LA elevated bike highway

The crowd cheered. Bugles rang out. Within a year, Dobbins promised, something similar to Columbus’s short route to the Orient would rise above the hills of the Los Angeles basin. His “Cycleway” was designed to swiftly and conveniently transport people between a pair of key urban centers: the old colonial plaza in Downtown Los Angeles, and Pasadena, the burgeoning, modern suburb to the north that then rivaled the older city in size and ambition. The Dobbins route—which neatly anticipated and presaged the automotive freeways that now stretch across the region—would be a modern marvel. It would boast a state-of-the-art toll-collecting system. It would be elevated fifteen feet above the ground; the limited access would ensure that traffic flowed smoothly. “It can be said,” wrote the Los Angeles Times of the ground breaking, “that none of the new Southern California enterprises will …be more certain of financial success. The wheel must have a path of its own between these two cities.”

via An 1899 Plan to Build A Bike Highway in Los Angeles (And Why It Failed).



Fukushima News Downplayed Health Concerns and Still Does

Oh yeah, that Fukushima thing. I remember that.

Four years after the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the disaster no longer dominates U.S. news headlines, though the disabled plant continues to pour three hundred tons of radioactive water into the ocean each day. Homes, schools and businesses in the Japanese prefecture are uninhabitable, and will likely be so forever. Yet the U.S. media has dropped the story while public risks remain.A new analysis by American University sociology professor Celine Marie Pascale finds that U.S. news media coverage of the disaster largely minimized health risks to the general population.

Pascale analyzed more than 2,000 news articles from four major U.S. outlets following the disasters occurrence March 11, 2011 through the second anniversary on March 11, 2013. Only 6 percent of the coverage—129 articles—focused on health risks to the public in Japan or elsewhere. Human risks were framed, instead, in terms of workers in the disabled nuclear plant.

via Fukushima News.



Tangled Web in Iraq as Iran-led militia fights ISIS

The army, backed by Shiite militia and Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, has yet to reconquer and secure any city held by Islamic State, despite seven months of air strikes by a U.S.-led coalition, as well as weapons supplies and strategic support from neighboring Iran.

Tehran, not Washington, has been the key player in the current offensive, with Iranian Revolutionary Guard general Qassem Soleimani seen directing operations on the eastern flank, and Iranian-backed militia fighters leading much of the operation.

via Islamic State torches oil field near Tikrit as militia advance | Reuters.




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